Sunday, June 25, 2017

Academic Fraud Cointinues As The Common Core Algebra I Regents Cut Scores Are Reduced Again.





















New York State Education Department, instead of making the Regents exam a test that measures a student's academic proficiency,  has made the gateway Math test easier to pass by artificially lowering the "cut scores" for the second year in a row.   According to the New York Post article the 2017 Algebra I Regents cut scores were lowered to 27 correct answers out of 86 questions or only 31.4% to receive a passing grade of 65%.  Last year the cut scores were 30 out of 86 or 34.9%.  Compare that to the first year of the Algebra 1 Common Core Regents exam when the cut scores were set at 31 correct answers out of 86, or 36.1%  to achieve a passing grade of 85%.  See one Math teacher's comparison Here.

Last year the lower cut scores resulted in a 10% increase in the New York City passing rate and its expected that an even larger percentage increase is expected this year since the 2017 cut scores are significantly lower.  The New York State Regents used to be the "gold standard" of student proficiency in a subject.  However, the political influences that affect the State Education Department has interfered with the educational process and is seen in the changing cut scores to achieve a certain passing percentage of the Regents exam.

If there is a silver lining for the lower cut scores, it's that Math teachers who have their student growth measures affected by the Math Regents exam will get a higher growth score factor since more of their and the school's students will have received a passing grade.

While I understand that the gateway Regents exams of Algebra 1, Living Environment, and Global were dumbed down to get more students to pass.  The continued lowering of the cut scores to meet an academic goal is simply political and is academic fraud as the State practices perception over reality when it comes to real academic progress.

Saturday, June 24, 2017

Why Renewal High Schools Continue To Fail.




























An admittedly biased study done by the pro-charter group, Families For Excellent Schools. have shown that the Renewal Schools have continued to under preform, despite the massive amount of money that went to the schools.  Moreover, these schools continue to shed students and excess teachers.  Finally, the Renewal Schools have a problem with chronic absenteeism and low student academic achievement.

The DOE tried to limit the influx of "high needs" students by eliminating acceptance of "over-the-counter" students to the Renewal Schools.  However, these schools could not attract academically proficient students either.  The result was that the Renewal High Schools continued to struggle academically and had trouble keeping students from fleeing the schools, when given the chance to leave.

To make matters worse, veteran teachers, the lifeblood of a properly functioning school, didn't want to work in the highly stressful environment of the Renewal School.  despite what Chancellor Carmen Farina claims.  The result is that the Renewal High Schools have a majority of inexperienced teachers who are subject to a steep learning curve to master classroom management and curriculum knowledge, not an optimal educational environment for a struggling student population.   Furthermore, the Renewal High Schools suffer from high teacher turnover, either because the teachers are excessed or use the Open Market Transfer System to escape the school. This makes the Renewal High Schools an unstable educational environment and hurts students academic achievement.

Adding to the already stressful educational environment, the Renewal High Schools are top heavy with both in school and outside administrators,  In fact, the administration of Amiee Horowitz is known to be the dumping grounds for failing or unwanted principals and other out of favor administrators.  This top-heavy and highly paid administrators gobble up the lion's share of the extra funding for the Renewal School program.

The Renewal High Schools have only met 24 of the 102 benchmarks set for them and had a chronic absenteeism rate of 44%, almost half of the students.  Finally, most Renewal High Schools had a "college and career readiness rate" of the teens or less and are considered "diploma mills", graduating students unprepared for college and careers.  Check out the two charts below and the problems stare you in the face.




Renewal High School
Enrollment
Students Chronically Absent
Academy of Urban Planning
227
49%
Long Island City High School
2077
44%
John Adams High School
2386
43%
Richmond Hill High School
1950
38%
August Martin High School
459
51%
Martin Van Buren High School
1544
41%
Flushing High School
1812
39%
Pan American International High School
380
26%
Brooklyn Collegiate: A College Board School
307
40%
Cypress Hills Collegiate Preparatory School
232
42%
Multicultural High School
208
36%
Brooklyn Generation School
234
23%
Frederick Douglass Academy IV Secondary School
77
49%
Boys and Girls High School
383
43%
Automotive High School
372
60%
Foundations Academy
73
70%
Juan Morel Campos Secondary School
622
38%
Peace and Diversity Academy
125
73%
Monroe Academy for Visual Arts & Design
416
64%
DeWitt Clinton High School
1694
45%
Fordham Leadership Academy for Business and Techno
410
45%
DreamYard Preparatory School
294
43%
Leadership Institute
180
53%
Bronx High School of Business
309
46%
Bronx Collegiate Academy
395
45%
Herbert H. Lehman High School
1092
50%
Holcombe L. Rucker School of Community Research
193
52%
Banana Kelly High School
234
60%
Foreign Language Academy of Global Studies
105
51%
New Explorers High School
426
60%
High School for Health Careers and Sciences
526
39%
Coalition School for Social Change
232
53%
Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing & Vis
377
59%
Henry Street School for International Studies
185
52%
All Renewal Schools
20,536
44.45%




  Renewal High School
4-Year College Readiness Index
2015
2016
+/-
Academy of Urban Planning
19%
11%
-8%
Long Island City High School
23%
25%
2%
John Adams High School
20%
22%
2%
Richmond Hill High School
16%
22%
6%
August Martin High School
2%
7%
5%
Martin Van Buren High School
14%
18%
4%
Flushing High School
21%
18%
-3%
Pan American International High School
52%[6]
38%
-13%
Brooklyn Collegiate: A College Board School
18%
16%
-3%
Cypress Hills Collegiate Preparatory School
10%
11%
1%
Multicultural High School
3%
11%
8%
Brooklyn Generation School
17%
16%
-1%
Frederick Douglass Academy IV Secondary School
11%
11%
0%
Boys and Girls High School
10%
7%
-3%
Automotive High School
3%
4%
1%
Foundations Academy
5%
14%
8%
Juan Morel Campos Secondary School
7%
3%
-4%
Peace and Diversity Academy
3%
11%
7%
Monroe Academy for Visual Arts & Design
5%
6%
2%
DeWitt Clinton High School
19%
19%
0%
Fordham Leadership Academy for Business and Technology
6%
6%
0%
DreamYard Preparatory School
3%
10%
7%
Leadership Institute
4%
2%
-2%
Bronx High School of Business
19%
15%
-5%
Bronx Collegiate Academy
12%
14%
2%
Herbert H. Lehman High School
11%
21%
10%
Holcombe L. Rucker School of Community Research
27%
6%
-21%
Banana Kelly High School
17%
7%
-10%
Foreign Language Academy of Global Studies
2%
14%
12%
New Explorers High School
20%
6%
-15%
High School for Health Careersand Sciences
10%
8%
-2%
Coalition School for Social Change
4%
8%
4%
Wadleigh Secondary School for the Performing & Vis
7%
7%
0%
Henry Street School for International Studies
39%
5%
-34%