Thursday, December 10, 2015

Goivernor Cuomo's Common Core Panel Is Recommending A Moratorium On Teacher Evaluations For The High Stakes State Tests.



















The large and ever growing "opt out" movement has apparently scared Governor Cuomo enough that his hand-picked Common Core Task Force will recommend an up to four year moratorium on linking teacher evaluations to the Common Core tests. Moreover, many of the Common Core Task Force's  other recommendations address the "opt out"movement complaints.  They are as follows:


  1. A moratorium of up to four years to decouple the teacher evaluation system until a fairer and more transparent system is developed.
  2. A slower roll out of the revised Common Core standards and increased flexibility to allow educators to create curriculum aligned to student needs.
  3. Shorter, fairer,  and more age appropriate tests will be developed and older tests will be made available to teachers as review material like Regents are presently.
While the Governor's Common Core Task Force was not empowered to address the teacher evaluation system.  It felt compelled to do so since most of the support of the "opt out" movement was due to the opposition of parents who objected to the linkage of the teacher evaluation to student test scores.  With the Governor's poll ratings in the toilet due to the education agenda he rammed through the State Legislature, it will be interesting to see if he decides to follow the recommendations of his hand-picked Common Core Task Force.


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4 comments:

Anonymous said...

Diane Ravitch is saying that during the moratorium teachers will still be rated on the tests 50% and the rating will be part of a teacher's permanent record, but can not be fired during this period based on the test scores. Have you heard any thing about this?

Chaz said...

That is incorrect. The student test scores will not be used to fire teachers based upon VAM. It will be an advisory note and nothing more,

Anonymous said...

An advisory note?! F-that. As the Judge in the Lederman case clearly seems to understand, our VAM APPR scores are completely arbitrary. We are better off getting our ratings by asking a drunken monkey to point to a random number on a feces smeared chalkboard.

Seriously, are we going to stand for this? Each time we get one of these ratings our careers are damaged - advisory note or not. The judge clearly found that the rating itself, and not the disciplinary action ( or, lack thereof), is the source of damage. The State Supreme Court already determined that at the earliest stage of the case. So, two things remain to be determined. 1st: quantify the monetary amount of the damage per teacher. 2nd: establish the arbitrary nature of the rating. Since NYSED has refused to comply with the judge's order for discovery, it seems the 2nd is essentially a matter of time. The first (quantifying the damage) will require a 2nd suit to be brought on a class action basis. Anybody care to be a member of that class? Specifically, I'm looking for volunteers who would like an award hefty enough to get them out of this crazy system for life. Whoa. Slow down. One at a time, people.

Screw this "advisory note" garbage. That's just as stigmatizing, damaging, and arbitrary as the current rating.

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