Monday, July 03, 2017

District 75 Schools Force Teachers To Teach Academics Rather Than The Life Skills Students Need.




























District 75 have the most disabled and behaviorally challenged students in the public school system.  These schools have self-contained classrooms with 6 to 8 students per class, along with a para or two.  Few, if any of these disabled students graduate with the academic skills to go to college and the few who do, are usually subject to no-credit remedial courses as they struggle not to fail out of the more demanding college environment.  Ask any District 75 teacher and they will tell you that their job should be to teach the students "life skills".  Like counting money, holding a job, taking public transportation, and practice good hygiene.  Instead the District 75 administrators, under pressure from DOE Central, forces the teachers to teach Common Core Math, Social Studies, and Science instead.

Many of the District 75 students have major academic issues due to their disability like autism, down syndrome, and ADD/ADHD.  Rather than train them to survive in the world after school, like how to develop social skills, working at a job,, make their own meals, and select their own clothes.  The District 75 administrators push these students to learn academic subjects that have little or no practical application to these students.

What good is it when the student can't dress or feed themselves properly and suffers from poor hygiene as they enters adulthood and interact with the rest of the adult world?  Who is there to train the child on "life skills" when their teachers are forced to teach academics instead?

The misguided policy of the District 75 administration only hurts the most vulnerable of children who graduate unprepared for independent living in the hard and cruel adult world. To me that its real educational malfeasance.

19 comments:

Prehistoric pedagogue said...

You have to be careful what you wish for .
The argument can certainly be made that you don't need certified teachers to instruct children how to wash their hands and count change up to a dollar

Anonymous said...

So true, and sad because our kids have talent and skills that are not recognized in our common core world of academics. Every child deserves the chance to shine with things they can be successful with, things and activities needed for independent living and functioning in an adult world.

Anonymous said...

again we as the front line soldiers allow this to happen! "be lucky you have a job" we talk and cry and complain but do nothing. WE ARE GETTING WHAT WE DESERVE!

NYC Educator said...

I can't speak to District 75, but can tell you that my school has an alternate assessment program. We do indeed teach life skills, and we bring the kids to worksites where they are taught practical skills. I know some, who are able, do take Regents exams but it's an individual decision. I'd suggest that, far from needing unqualified or less qualified teachers, these kids need the most qualified teachers. I taught special education for one semester and I was not very good at it. This is a very tough job and it would be rank idiocy to simply dump anyone into it. That said, rank idiocy is a lot more common than I'd like it to be.

Anonymous said...

Another example of the road to hell is paved with good intentions on the basis of the monkey pulling the fish up the tree and kindly saying let me help you before you drown.

Anonymous said...

As an ATR I've babysat many District 75 classes. The autistic kids are much better behaved the regular ed thugs I usually deal with. No smell of weed, no suck my dick nigga, no throwing water bottles when you turn your back. No one gives a shit about any of these kids - reg, sped, or district 75. Its warehousing, plain and simple. No one's learning anything. Give them their diploma and let CUNY or SUNY deal with them.

Anonymous said...

About 20 years ago I taught in D75. The students were taught based on their IEP. That said, Common Core must be on the way out. Sure, it can be adapted for the students in D75, but this seems to me to be an administrator's way to try to make common core- a failed idea for general ed students-relevant.
Thank you NYC Educator, being a special ed teacher is the best job there is.
3:55-sorry you feel that way, but please don't speak for me, I do care.

Anonymous said...

Well, CUNY and SUNY are not tolerating it! By the second year of college many leave and by the second more. Third year is when it is nice because those that have been weeded out are gone. Plain and simple. Four year CUNY and SUNY look at SAT scores carefully. If there is a discrepency with inflated school grades and not so great regent scores, it raises a red flag.
To get into a four year CUNY and SUNY is competitive. CUNY and SUNY know exactly what is going on.

Chaz said...

Anon 10:02

NYC Educator is not a Special Education teacher but an English teacher who teaches ESL students.

Anonymous said...

7:55,
The truth is the truth. It's upsetting and should be. Perhaps after visiting 80 schools I've seen more than you? You know it's true, but are you or anyone else going to put their livelihoods on the line? Perhaps you are already retired? I've spoken out and am an ATR and will remain one. What's the difference between caring and staying silent or not caring? Assuage your guilt if you must, but saying you care and being part of what I see going on is not caring. I hope that does offend many teachers out there that are doing nothing but babysitting and changing grades.

Anonymous said...

If the NYC Department of Education is not acting in the best interests of students, then file a complaint with the NYS Education Department (the Commissioner of Education and the Board of Regents).

Let them deal with it!

Anonymous said...

I no longer work for the DOE, but between day to day subbing and regular teaching I worked at over 10 schools in over 10 years. The kids are all basically the same-kids. Honestly, I didn't have the mental toughness to deal with the not nice administrators. It's hard to believe that they could be like that, but, looking back, some of them were from that Broad School- so they didn't have a clue and were probably being mean to cover that up.
I've felt pushed aside and marginalized at the job-on top of that my own kids were growing up and I felt lost at home. This is no comparison to being an ATR, but the feelings I felt were terrible, and it took awhile to get my feet back.
I'm teaching again, but for a lot less than the DOE. A lot less stress too. In a few years I'm hoping to retire. Presently, I'm re-training for a retirement job, so I can supplement my income.
I'm sorry that you feel that way, but I do care. The ways I helped students and even co-workers, maybe just to get through the day, are real successes.
Good luck to you.

Anonymous said...

2:26,
If you do that you'll be investigated and will go through a 3020a. Then if you're lucky, you'll be an ATR.

Anonymous said...

Just to make a comment about the idea that these kids in d75 don't need certified teachers.... real programs for children with autism that use applied Behavior Analysis normally have Masters level psychologist running the classroom and a Phd running the program I agree that a license in special education is completely insignificant but don't say that these kids just need a babysitter it takes real skill to educate these children

Anonymous said...

Just to make a comment about the idea that these kids in d75 don't need certified teachers.... real programs for children with autism that use applied Behavior Analysis normally have Masters level psychologist running the classroom and a Phd running the program I agree that a license in special education is completely insignificant but don't say that these kids just need a babysitter it takes real skill to educate these children

Anonymous said...

What do you mean "A license in special education is completely insignificant"?

Anonymous said...

I mean exactly that, a license in special education is insignificant. One course, if that even, in autism or how to work with emotionally disturbed youth or a project in reading disabilities can possibly prepare a teacher in how to work with these very complex group of students. Most if not all special education teachers even with their masters walk in and have little to absolutely no idea what to do, rendering their license and Masters completely insignificant in the face of overwhelming need of these students

Anonymous said...

8:37-It takes commitment to get any license. Then of course, you need experience and continued learning to become more of an expert. A doctor or lawyer who has a license, but has never used it, is probably not such a good bet. But who would go to any doctor or lawyer who didn't even have the license? No, the best combination is the person with the license and who is active and experienced in the field.

Anonymous said...

because we ALL know that one day they can become the doctors and lawyers of the city. one thing they can become are teachers or administrators.